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Easy-to-grow vegetables and herbs

Bush Beans
Green beans are a healthy summer favorite, both for their fresh crunch and flavor. They also add a bright shot of green to your dinner plate.
In your garden: Plant your bean seeds in well-drained soil where they’ll receive full sun. Sow seeds every few weeks to enjoy a continual harvest through the summer.

Carrots
Carrots are a perennial favorite—delicious raw or cooked, and they can be prepared in a variety of ways.
In your garden: Plant carrots as soon as the soil can be worked. They thrive in fertile sandy loam.

Cucumbers
Cucumbers are a tasty addition to salads, add crunch to your crudités plate and even taste good cooked.
In your garden: Give your cucumber plants generous amounts of organic matter and good fertilization and they will respond with lots of crunchy cucumbers; harvest them regularly to increase production.

Gourmet Lettuce Mix
Lettuce is easy to grow, making it a great choice for container gardening. This mix of greens tastes great in a salad or on a sandwich.
In your garden: Lettuce thrives in cooler weather so plant it in the spring and fall, sowing every few weeks for a continuous harvest.

Snap Peas
These sweet peas with edible pods make a great snack on their own, and are just as welcome cooked up into a satisfying side dish.
In your garden: Snap peas are hardy legumes that germinate in soil temperatures as low as 40°F, but don’t do so well in hot and dry weather. Plant your peas so that they can mature as early as your planting schedule allows and sow more seeds when cooler fall days return.

Radishes
These spicy, crunchy globes are packed with flavor. And radishes are more versatile than you may think: add them to a salad or temper their heat by cooking them in your favorite veggie stir-fry.
In your garden: Even if you don’t have a green thumb, radishes are easy to grow in containers and gardens; spring radish varieties are often ready in just three weeks and are more mild in flavor—hotter summer soil produces spicier radishes.

Mild Mustard Salad Mix
Peppery and spicy mustard greens, like mizuna and pac choi, add great zing to salads. Try them when your recipe calls for Asian salad mix.
In your garden: You can sow salad greens in your garden from early spring to midsummer.

Dill
With both the leaves and seeds used for seasoning, dill is a very versatile herb. The leaves are soft and sweet, whereas the seeds have a sweet and citrusy taste that is slightly bitter.
In your garden: The herb can be used both fresh and dried. Plant your dill seeds in warmer temperatures: it thrives in soil around 75 to 80°F.

Cilantro
Cilantro is a flavorful herb prominent in Mexican and Southeast Asian cookery. Try it as an alternative to basil in pesto to top fish or stir it into your favorite salsa recipe. The stems are as flavorful as the leaves—just discard any that are tough.
In your garden: Plant cilantro early in the season and sow seeds regularly for a continued harvest.

Parsley
Often parsley is used as a garnish, leaving its delicious flavor underappreciated. Not only does it have a great aromatic quality, but parsley also contains vitamins A and C.
In your garden: Plant parsley in fertile soil with good amounts of organic matter and moisture.
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